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MSP RONA CONGRATULATES INSPIRATIONAL DEAFBLIND MAN ON SUCCESS

RORY DONALDSON RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS AWARD FOR HELPING OTHERS


Strathkelvin and Bearsden MSP Rona Mackay has congratulated a deafblind man from Lenzie who has received a national award for helping other people with dual sensory loss to learn how to read and access an alternative system to braille.


Rory Donaldson was presented with the prestigious Sensory Loss - Positive Self Management Award 2022 by Health and Social Care Alliance Scotland (ALLIANCE) at a recent online ceremony, attended by Humza Yousaf, Cabinet Secretary for Health.


SNP MSP Ms Mackay presented Rory last week with a special framed motion from the Scottish Parliament, commending him on is achievement.

Rory learned to use 'Moon' an alternative system of raised shapes which can help blind and partially sighted people to read by touch, at individual sessions at Deafblind Scotland whose headquarters are near his home.


He then not only taught other deafblind people how to read Moon, he is also now adapting teaching resources to enable many more deafblind people who can't travel to the centre at Lenzie to learn independently.


Commenting on Rory's success, Ms Mackay said: "What a fantastic achievement. Rory's commitment to improving the lives of other people with sensory loss is inspirational.


"I was delighted to put forward a motion a the Scottish Parliament to celebrate his success and I wish him all the best for the future."


Rory was presented with the framed motion from Rona Mackay at the Deafblind Centre at Lenzie last week.


The Chief Executive of Deafblind Scotland Isabella Goldie was also in attendance to congratulate Rory on his success.


Moon is an alternative to braille, devised by blind English doctor, Dr William Moon, in 1845.

Although braille was invented16 years prior in France, it hadnot reached the United Kingdom at this time.


Moon is a system of raised shapes. The characters are made up of raised lines and curves, similar to the print alphabet, to create a set of basic shapes.

These shapes are rotated or reflected to create the 26 letters of the alphabet and additional dots are used for punctuation marks and the numeral sign.



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